Kurukulla Tibetan Statue

Kurukulla Tibetan Statue

$105

Kurukulla Tibetan Statue is made in Nepal by master statue artists. The weight of the statue is 0.164 kg and the size is 10 x 4 x 6cm.

SKU: HRSH-23715 Category:

Description

Kurukulla Tibetan Statue is made in Nepal by master statue artists. The weight of the statue is 0.164 kg and the size is 10 x 4 x 6cm.

The material used to make this statue is Copper. Kurukulla is a female peaceful to semi-wrathful Yidam in Tibetan Buddhism particularly associated with rites of magnetization or enchantment.

Kurukulla is a goddess with four arms and a red body. Her one pair of hands holds a bow and arrow made of flowers, while the other pair holds a hook and noose made of flowers. She crushes the asura Rahu by dancing in a Dakini-pose (the one who devours the sun).

According to Hindu astrology, Rahu is a snake with a demon head (Navagraha) who represents the ascending lunar node. Kurukulla was most likely an Indian tribal deity who wielded magical power. At least as early as the Hevajra Tantra, which contains her mantra, she was absorbed into the Buddhist pantheon. In Tibetan Buddhism, her function is the “red” function of subjugation.

Kurukulla Mantra

The Kurukulla mantra of is Om Kurukulle Hrih Svaha.

Gallery

Additional information

Weight 0.164 kg
Dimensions 4 × 10 cm

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