About Suffering

Suffering is the state of undergoing pain, distress, or hardship.
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The Noble Truth Of The Path That Leads To The Extinction Of Suffering

This is the third Nobel Truth. The first Nobel truth is The Nobel Truth Of , the second Nobel truth is The Noble Truth Of The Origin Of Suffering, the third is The Noble Truth Of The Extinction Of Suffering and the last one is The Noble Truth Of The Path That Leads To The Extinction Of Suffering. The Two Extremes And The Middle Path TO GIVE oneself up to indulgence in sensual pleasure, the base, .

The Noble Truth Of The Extinction Of Suffering

This is the third Nobel Truth. The first Nobel truth is The Nobel Truth Of , the second Nobel truth is The Noble Truth Of The Origin Of Suffering, And the third is The Noble Truth Of The Extinction Of Suffering. The Noble Truth Of The Extinction Of Suffering WHAT, now, is the Noble Truth of the Extinction of Suffering? It is the complete fading away and extinction of this craving, its forsaking and giving up, .

The Noble Truth Of The Origin Of Suffering

This is the . The first Nobel truth is The Nobel Truth Of and the second is The Noble Truth Of The Origin Of Suffering. Even the most beautiful things in the world suffer. The Noble Truth Of The Origin Of Suffering WHAT, now, is the Noble Truth of the Origin of Suffering? It is that craving which gives rise to fresh rebirth, and, bound up with pleasure and lust, now here, now there, .

The Noble Truth Of Suffering

THE It has it been said by the , the Enlightened One: It is through not understanding, not realizing four things, that I, Disciples, as well as you, had to wander so long through this round of rebirths. And what are these four things? They are the Noble Truth of , The Noble Truth of the Origin of Suffering The Noble Truth of the Extinction of Suffering The Noble Truth of the .
Amitabha Buddha Buddhist Thangka Painting

The enigmatic blend of rationality and devotion in Buddhism

At first, appears to be an enigma. On the one hand, it is highly logical and rational, without any dogmatic beliefs. On the other hand, when we come into contact with its , we find that it includes , doctrines beyond our understanding, and a program of training that emphasizes faith and discourages doubt. Empirical approach vs spiritual viewpoint When we attempt to understand our own bond with the Dhamma, we eventually face .
Avalokiteshvara Thangka Painting

Samatha as a preparatory stage for Vipassanā

is commonly seen as a foundational practice, serving as a preparatory step for more advanced of , including Vipassanā. It plays a crucial role in calming the and reducing distractions, making it easier for practitioners to progress in their spiritual journey. Vipassanā, on the other hand, is considered an advanced practice that directly addresses the insight and components of the . It is often undertaken after a foundation in .
Kuījī, also known as Ji, an exponent of Yogācāra, was a Chinese monk and a prominent disciple of Xuanzang. His posthumous name was Cí'ēn dàshī, The Great Teacher of Cien Monastery, after the Daci'en Temple or Great Monastery of Compassionate Grace, which was located in Chang'an, the main capital of the Tang Dynasty. The Giant Wild Goose Pagoda was built in Daci'en Temple in 652. According to biographies, he was sent to the imperial translation bureau headed by Xuanzang, from whom he later would learn Sanskrit, Abhidharma, and Yogācāra.

The nature of reality, consciousness and compassion

Imagine you're in a room filled with , each reflecting a slightly different version of yourself. As you look around, it's challenging to determine which reflection is the real "you". Are you the image closest to the mirror's surface, or is the true "you" hidden within the depths of the glass? This intriguing scenario mirrors a fundamental philosophical question that has puzzled scholars and thinkers for centuries: the nature of reality and . The 's .

108 Verses Praising Great Compassion By Lama Lobsang Tayang

This translation of 108 Verses Praising is of the renowned Lobsang Tayang's . He was a highly esteemed interpreter of the Gelugpa tradition, and his writings cover a wide range of literature, , logic and . About Lama Lobsang Tayang was born in 1867 in the Gobi desert, was renowned for his vast of . He was compared to the Indian pandit Ashvagosha, author of the “50 Verses .
Phurba Gallery

The Tantric Phurba – A protective ritual dagger

The is a dagger used in practices. It is used to protect against negative energies and to promote positive change. The phurba is not to be used for or harm, and should only be used for ritual purposes. It is a powerful for protection and should be used with care and respect. Origin of Phurba in The renowned , who was initiated by the Indian sage Prabhahastin, is said .
What is Downward Facing Dog Pose?

What is Downward Facing Dog Pose?

Downward Dog Pose and Downward-facing Dog Pose is also known as Adho Mukha Shvanasana. Downward-facing Dog Pose is an inversion in as exercise which is often practiced as part of a flowing sequence of poses especially which means the Salute to the . The asana does not have formally named variations but several playful variants are used to assist beginning practitioners to become comfortable in the pose. Downward Dog stretches .