Tibetan Dragon Facing Left

Tibetan Dragon Facing Left

From $109

The dragon is one of the four Chinese spiritual animals.  The others are the Phoenix, unicorn and the tortoise. As protectors of the four directions or, cardinal points of the compass, they are the red bird, white tiger, dragon,

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Description

The dragon is one of the four Chinese spiritual animals.  The others are the Phoenix, unicorn and the tortoise. As protectors of the four directions or, cardinal points of the compass, they are the red bird, white tiger, dragon, tortoise.

Much has been made of the distinguishing characteristics of the various Asian dragons.  There is an iconographic convention in which the common dragon is four-clawed, the five-clawed one is the celestial one that is the Chinese Imperial emblem, and the colonial type such as the Japanese one is shown with only three.

The image of a dragon, its face of mask or an abstract design representing its serpentine form is generally used as a protective mark.

In the Tibetan tradition, the turquoise dragon is said to protect against discord of all types but especially slanderous gossip and the misuse of words.   Dragons often appear on metal musical instruments such as bells, gongs and the small cymbals that can serve to represent the music offering on a Buddhist shrine.  This may relate to the roar of righteous indignation of the protective dragon but also to its legendary love of music.

They are also often found in architecture where they protect against fire and earthquakes.  Their image functions as a kind of amulet or talisman of security so they are found at the bases of monuments, on bridges and on the eaves of roofs.

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Dimensions 19 × 84 cm
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Discover more about "dragon thangkas"

The dragon as a symbol of enlightenment. Today dragons decorate roofs and gates of temples, both as guardians and to symbolize the dragon's power of clarity. Buddhist dragons often are depicted holding a mani jewel, which represents the Buddha's teaching.

Representation of Dragons in Tibetan Culture

has the largest tradition of Dragon which dates back more than 7000 years. are not just mythical stories or just some curiosities. They are part of life and . The of dragons are everywhere from the beginning of Tibetan and the importance is still up until today. In Tibet, Dragon is considered as one of the dignities. There is a total of four dignities. Tiger, , and the .

Lion Faced Dakini – Singhamukha Yogini

Lion-faced is a secret form of also has a relationship to Troma and the practice of . She is appropriate for clearing obstacles of the most pervasive and malignant kind and cutting through the “” of . This practice has been important in since the of . PeGyal Lingpa received this revelation directly from , appearing in a red-black form, instead of the more common dark .

Characteristics of Tibetan Art – a psychological and meditational practice

started from the rock in and its subjects ranged from animal images of deer, ox, sheep, horse, etc to hunting scenes. have flourished very well during the period of the Tubo Kingdom. Especially after the installation of in , made a more progress. Introduction to Tibetan Art The heritage of conventional and the fusion of , and Han People’s art essence .

Framing Your Thangka with Brocade

We offer our clients the option of purchasing a mounted in the brocaded way or, for those who wish a frame of their own choosing, unmounted/unframed . The fabric protects the edges of the Thangka, and also makes it easier to hang. A thin silk cover protects the when rolled, and may be gathered up to display the painting when hung on the wall. It is generally thought that silk .