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Kuījī, also known as Ji, an exponent of Yogācāra, was a Chinese monk and a prominent disciple of Xuanzang. His posthumous name was Cí'ēn dàshī, The Great Teacher of Cien Monastery, after the Daci'en Temple or Great Monastery of Compassionate Grace, which was located in Chang'an, the main capital of the Tang Dynasty. The Giant Wild Goose Pagoda was built in Daci'en Temple in 652. According to biographies, he was sent to the imperial translation bureau headed by Xuanzang, from whom he later would learn Sanskrit, Abhidharma, and Yogācāra.

The nature of reality, consciousness and compassion

Imagine you're in a room filled with , each reflecting a slightly different version of yourself. As you look around, it's challenging to determine which reflection is the real "you." Are you the image closest to the mirror's surface, or is the true "you" hidden within the depths of the glass? This intriguing scenario mirrors a fundamental philosophical question that has puzzled scholars and thinkers for centuries: the nature of reality and . The 's .

108 Verses Praising Great Compassion By Lama Lobsang Tayang

This translation of 108 Verses Praising is of the renowned Lobsang Tayang's . He was a highly esteemed interpreter of the Gelugpa tradition, and his writings cover a wide range of literature, , logic and . About Lama Lobsang Tayang was born in 1867 in the Gobi desert, was renowned for his vast of . He was compared to the Indian pandit Ashvagosha, author of the “50 Verses .
Tara (Buddhist Deity) - (Atisha, 21 Taras)

Renowned female Buddhist spiritual leaders

The rise of in the world has provided women with a chance to take on new roles in the Buddhist tradition. Women have become more involved in movements to restore the ordination lineages for nuns in the Theravada and Vajrayana traditions. This has been a major part of the transformation of Buddhism globally, as women are now seen more often as practitioners and teachers. While Asian Buddhist women have already made their mark in Buddhist history, .

The two truths within Buddhist philosophy

In this video asserts that the taught two aspects of reality: the conceptual and the ultimate. The conceptual aspect involves using language and concepts to help people understand reality, such as using the concepts of self or existence. The ultimate aspect, however, refers to the true nature of reality, which according to Yuttadhammo, is the world as we experience it. Yuttadhammo believes that this can help individuals understand and manage .
Acarya Bhavaviveka converting a nonbeliever to buddhism

Bhāviveka – The founder of the Svātantrika tradition of the Mādhyamaka school

, also known as Bhavya or Bhāvaviveka, was a 6th century . In , Bhāviveka is considered the founder of the Svātantrika tradition of the Mādhyamaka school, which is considered to be an antagonist of the Prāsaṅgika Madhyamaka. The Madhyamaka school The Madhyamaka school, also known as the "" school, is a major tradition within Indian . The Madhyamaka , as propounded by the Indian Nāgārjuna in the 2nd century, asserts .

Tibetan Gau boxes & Amulets

Ga'u or Gawu is a item also known as box. Gau are generally made from hand hammered metals. The purpose and function of an amulet box is for general protection and protection when traveling. Amulet boxes are also commonly used to store all manner of materials such as small texts, blessing cords, consecrated , relics, and the like. Types of Gau Box Tibetan Gau boxs can be categorized according to their size, .
Marathon Monk art

The Spiritual Athlete’s Path to Enlightenment

Throughout this world, there are many mysterious and amazing feats that can be found. People are capable of doing most incredible things that we have never deemed possible. Only by truly believing in ourselves can we accomplish what were thought as impossible goals. Marathon of In Mount Hiei of , there can be found a small group of who live in a and can accomplish many remarkable challenges. This mountain had .
Lung-gom-pa runner

The Tibetan Lung-gom-pa runners

is an esoteric skill in that is believed to enable practitioners to run for extended periods of without tiring. This technique is similar to those used by Kaihōgyō in and practitioners of Shugendō. Like so much about , Lung-gom-pa running remains something of an enigma. through physical endurance Lung-gom-pa, also known as " marathon runners," is a form of spiritual training within Tibetan . This practice involves intensive spiritual training, .