About Monuments

Monastic, religious, or sacred structures explicitly created as places of worship or commemoration and which are relevant to the cultural heritage due to their artistic, spiritual or historical importance.

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Gokarneshwar – A sacred site on the bank of the Bagmati River

The Bagmati River is a of to . A holy dip in the Bagmati river is said to free people from all the sins they have committed in this lifetime. There are numerous legends surrounding the of the river and the creation of on its banks. Along with the great , Gokarneshwar, also known as Gokarna is one of the holiest places located on the banks of river .
Mengshan Giant Buddha, Taiyuan

Colossal Buddha statues – sculptures of the Buddhist era

After the collapse of the Indus Valley civilization there is little record of larger sculpture until the Buddhist era. During the 2nd to 1st century BCE in far northern India, in the Greco-Buddhist art of Gandhara from what is now southern Afghanistan and northern Pakistan, sculptures became more explicit, representing episodes of the Buddha's life and teachings. Since then many Colossal Buddha were carved across the silk road and later beyond south Asia. This is a .
Wat suthud

Magnificent Buddhist temples in Bangkok

Bangkok, officially known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon and colloquially as Krung Thep, is the capital and most populous city of Thailand. The majority (93 percent) of the city's population is Buddhist. Rama I (reigned 1782–1809) of the Chakri Dynasty (which remains the current royal family of Thailand) founded the Rattanakosin Kingdom. Under Rama I, new were constructed at the new capital of Rattanakosin (modern Bangkok), such as the royal Wat, Wat .
Chedi of Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon, built by King Naresuan the Great

Buddhist temples in Thailand – cultural & historical heritage

Buddhist in Thailand are characterized by tall golden stupas, and the Buddhist architecture of Thailand is similar to that in other Southeast Asian countries, particularly Cambodia and Laos, with which Thailand shares cultural and historical heritage. In addition to the ecclesiastical leadership of the sangha, a secular government ministry supervises Buddhist temples and monks. According to the Office of National Buddhism, there are 41,205 Buddhist temples in Thailand of which 33,902 are active. 31,890 are .

Buddhist monuments and the Kings of Patan

Long ago, Sarvananda of Dipavati invited sages around the country for distributing alms. , a Buddha who reached prior to , was also invited. However, instead of visiting the palace, Dipankara Buddha visited a nearby hut belonging to an old lady. In late 2021, a 1400-year-old stone inscription was discovered in front of the Bhimsen at Durbar. It was kept there by Lichhavi ruler Anshu Verma. The inscription .
Phra Pathom Chedi, one of the earliest Buddhist stupas in Thailand

Buddhist Stupas in Thailand – The golden architectural era

Buddhist temples in Thailand are characterized by tall golden , and the Buddhist architecture of Thailand is similar to that in other Southeast Asian countries, particularly Cambodia and Laos, with which Thailand shares cultural and historical heritage. During Ram Khamhaeng's reign, stupas were built, reflecting the Sri Lankan influence. One of these is Wat Chang Lom. Thai travelers to Sri Lanka also brought back the root of a Bodhi tree, which began the Thai tradition of .
World Peace Pagoda, Lumbini

Buddhist Stupas in Nepal – The relics of the Buddha

in Nepal date back to the Licchavi period. is one of the oldest known buildings in the country and was likely built in the 5th century. It was built in Swayambhu, Kathmandu, where the land was declared as sacred to Siddhartha Gautama (Buddha), by the 3rd Emperor of the Maurya Dynasty Ashoka the Great in the 3rd century BCE. According to the legends, the stupa came out of a sacred lotus at the centre .
Gumbatona stupa, Swat, KPK

Buddhist Stupas in Pakistan – Wonders of the Kashmira-Gandhara region

Buddhism in Pakistan took root some 2,300 years ago under the Mauryan king Ashoka who sent missionaries to the Kashmira-Gandhara region of North West Pakistan extending into Afghanistan, following the Third Buddhist council in Pataliputra (modern India). Majjhantika, a monk from Varanasi was the first Buddhist to preach in Kashmir and Gandhara. Buddhist sites in Sindh are numerous but ill preserved in various stages of deterioration. Sites at Brahmanabad (Mansura Sanghar district) include a Buddhist stupa .
Abayagiri Dageba, Sri Lanka

Buddhist Stupas in Sri Lanka – The tallest pre-modern structures

, also called dagobas and cetiyas, are considered an outstanding type of architectural creation of ancient Sri Lanka. Stupas were built in Sri Lanka soon after Devanampiya Tissa of Anuradhapura converted to Buddhism. The first stupa to be built was the Thuparamaya. Later, many more were built over the years, some like the Jetavanaramaya in Anuradhapura, being one of the tallest ancient structures in the world. Under the influence of Buddhism, there were several changes in .
Sanchi Stupa No.2, the earliest known stupa with important displays of decorative reliefs, circa 125 BCE

Buddhist Stupas in India – The earliest Buddhist buildings

Religious buildings in the form of the Buddhist stupa, a dome shaped monument, started to be used in India as commemorative associated with storing sacred relics of the Buddha. The earliest archaeological evidence for the presence of Buddhist dates to the late 4th century BCE. In India, , Sarnath, Amaravati and are among the oldest known stupas. After the parinirvana of the Buddha, his remains were cremated and the ashes divided and buried .