Chedi of Wat Yai Chai Mongkhon, built by King Naresuan the Great

Buddhist in Thailand – cultural & historical heritage

Buddhist temples in Thailand are characterized by tall golden stupas, and the Buddhist architecture of Thailand is similar to that in other Southeast Asian countries, particularly Cambodia and Laos, with which Thailand shares cultural and historical heritage.

In addition to the ecclesiastical leadership of the sangha, a secular government ministry supervises Buddhist temples and monks.

According to the Office of National Buddhism, there are 41,205 Buddhist temples in Thailand of which 33,902 are active.

31,890 are of the Maha Nikaya and 1,987 are of the Dhammayuttika Nikaya orders of the Theravada school, while 12 are of the Chinese Nikaya and 13 are of the Anam Nikaya orders of the Mahayana school.

The following is a non-exhaustive .

Wat

A is a type of Buddhist temple and Hindu temple in Cambodia, Laos, East Shan State, Yunnan and Thailand.

The word wat is borrowed from Sanskrit vāṭa meaning ‘enclosure’.

Wat Pha Sorn Kaew

, also known as Wat Phra That Pha Son Kaeo, is a Buddhist monastery and temple in Khao Kor, Phetchabun, in north-central Thailand, about 5 hours drive north of Bangkok. The Wat is set on an 830m peak, a few hundred meters from the town of Kheam Son on the main highway 12, between Phitsanulok and Lom Sak.

Wat Phra Mahathat

Woramahawihan is the main Buddhist temple (wat) of Nakhon Si Thammarat Province in southern Thailand. The main stupa of the temple, Phra Borommathat Chedi, was built by King Sri Dhammasokaraja in the early-13th century CE to establish a symbol for the Theravada Buddhism sect in the province. The temple is believed to house a tooth of Gautama Buddha.

Wat Klang Bang Kaeo

is a temple in Nakhon Chai Si District, Central Thailand. Located on the Tha Chin River, the temple was established during the Ayutthaya period.

Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew

, also known as the Temple of a Million Bottles, is a Buddhist temple in Khun Han district of Sisaket province, Thailand. The temple is made of over 1.5 million empty Heineken bottles and Chang beer bottles. Collection of the bottles began in 1984; it took two years to build the main temple. Thereafter, the monks continued to expand the site, and by 2009 some 20 buildings had been similarly constructed.

Wat Phrathat Doi Kong Mu

is an ancient Thai Buddhist temple in Mae Hong Son province, northern Thailand, considered as a provincial temple.

Wat Sri Chomphu Ong Tue

, Wat Ongtue or Wat Nam Mong is a Buddhist temple in Thailand. The temple houses Luang Pho Phraehao Ongtue one of the largest Buddha representations in all of Laos which stands four meters tall and is believed to have been cast in 1562.

Wat Tha Mai

is a Buddhist temple in Krathum Baen, Samut Sakhon, Thailand. It was known for sacred objects such as amulets and talismans. Many Thai celebrities visit this temple as part of their philanthropy and benefit from fortune telling by abbot Pra Ar Jan Uten Sirisaro. These activities have been criticized as commercialization of Buddhism. The temple is also well known in Thailand for placing its decals on rear windows of visitors’ cars, producing more than 30,000 stickers each month.

Be the first to comment Here

Related posts

Doleshwor Mahadev: The forgotten Head of Kedarnath

After a treacherous trip up the mountains, Bhimsen, one of the five Pandavas spotted a gigantic looking bull in a distance which he knew was in disguise. Bhimsen known for his brute strength, forcefully caught the bull. When the bull was caught, he tried to escape but unfortunately, the bull was torn into several parts because of Bhimsen’s strength. Mahabharata, the epic depicts the struggle for power and conflict between two groups of .

Ram Mandir and the legend of Battisputali

There were 32 scupltures of fairies placed inside the inner walls of Ram Mandir which led to the place being called Battisputali (32 fairies with butterfly wings). There is an enthralling story behind the fairies installed here. The epic Ramayana written by Valmiki has captivated people from all over the world for centuries. is believed to be the seventh incarnation of Lord . He is worshipped by from all over .
A view of Ajanta caves after monsoons

Buddhist caves in India – An achievement of craftsmanship

The Buddhist caves in India form an important part of Indian rock-cut architecture, and are among the most prolific examples of rock-cut architecture around the world. There are more than 1,500 known rock cut structures in India, out of which about 1000 were made by Buddhists, 300 by Hindus, and 200 by Jains. Many of these structures contain works of art of global importance, and many later caves from the Mahayana period are adorned .

The Holy Sites and Vibrant Tales in Dang

The Pandeshwor Mahadev is thought to have been established by Pandavas during their exile. There’s also an interesting local legend regarding the inside the temple and Saaj tree attached to the temple. When we travel through the Valley, which lies between the Mahabharat Range in the north and the Churia Range in the south, we travel back in , into the exciting tales of , , and queens. There .
Main sanctuary of Fo Guang Shan Monastery near Kaohsiung

Established Buddhist organizations in Taiwan

The growth of Buddhism in Taiwan was spearheaded by a number of organizations developing during this period led by various teachers who took a socially engaged approach in accordance with Humanistic Buddhist philosophy. As Buddhist groups become more involved in people's everyday lives there has been a general push to make the teachings of Buddhism more relevant and applicable to modern- day issues such as environmental protection, human rights and stress management. These developments helped .
Fo Guang Shan Buddha Museum

Fo Guang Shan temples around the world

Founded in 1967 by Hsing Yun, the order promotes Humanistic Buddhism and is known for its efforts in the modernization of Chinese Buddhism. The order is famous for its use of technology and its are often furnished with the latest equipment. In 1981, 15 years after its establishment, the Great Hero Hall was built. During these times, many other Fo Guang Shan temples outside the order's mother monastery were also built. Today temples and organizations .
Lerab Ling Buddhist Temple in the south of france.

Tibetan Buddhist centers in France

The first Tibetan Buddhist communities in France were established in the early 1970s. The highest-ranking head of schools to reside in France, Phendé Khenchen, established his temple of E Wam Phendé Ling in 1973. He is of the Ngor school of Buddhism. Buddhism in France's growth was catalyzed by visits, in 1975 of the Karmapa, head of the Kagyü school, Dudjom Rinpoche and Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, also very high lamas, who visited Dordogne, where .
Wat Srinagarindravararam in Gretzenbach

Established Buddhist temples in Switzerland

Geshe Rabten Rinpoche founded in 1977 in Mont Pèlerin a Buddhist monastery and study centre for European monks, nuns and lay people as well. One year later, in 1978 the Swiss Buddhist Union (Schweizerische Buddhistische Union / Union Suisse des Bouddhistes / Unione Buddhista Svizzera) was founded by the Czech Buddhist Mirko Fryba. Switzerland is now home to several Tibetan-Buddhist and Zen monasteries, among them the located in Zell-Rikon im Tösstal in .
Danjōgaran in Mount Kōya, Wakayama prefecture, Japan.

The major Shingon temples in Japan

Shingon Buddhism (真言宗, Shingon-shū) is one of the major schools of Buddhism in Japan and one of the few surviving Vajrayana lineages in East Asia, originally spread from India to China through traveling monks such as Vajrabodhi and .