• Avalokitesvara is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. This bodhisattva is variably depicted, described and is portrayed in different cultures as either female or male. In Chinese Buddhism, Avalokiteśvara has become the somewhat different female figure Guanyin. In Cambodia, he appears as Lokesvarak, and in Japan, he is called Kanzeon or Kannon. Avalokiteshvara is the earthly manifestation of the self-born eternal Buddha Amitabha, whose figure is represented in his headdress, and he guards the world in the interval between the departure of the historical Buddha, Gautama, and the appearance of the future Buddha, Maitreya.
  • A Lord Buddha is a very holy person in Buddhism. The word Buddha means "enlightened one" in Sanskrit. Buddha was born Siddhartha Gautama. He was the man who started Buddhism. Sometimes people call him "the Buddha". Other times, people call any person a Buddha if they have found enlightenment.
  • “Chakra” is a Sanskrit word literally meaning “wheel.” These centers were named as such because of the circular shape to the spinning energy centers which exist in our subtle etheric body, the non-material energetic counterpart to our physical body. There are seven main chakras and they are located along the spine extending out the front and back of the body.
  • Buddhism includes a wide array of divine beings that are venerated in various ritual and popular contexts. Initially, they included mainly Indian deities such as devas and yakshas but later came to include other Asian spirits and local gods. They range from enlightened Buddhas to regional spirits adopted by Buddhists or practiced on the margins of the religion.
  • The dragon as a symbol of enlightenment. Today dragons decorate roofs and gates of temples, both as guardians and to symbolize the dragon's power of clarity. Buddhist dragons often are depicted holding a mani jewel, which represents the Buddha's teaching.
  • Yama is a Tantric Buddhist. Yama is called as wisdom deity and protector of the Method Class (father) of Anuttaryoga Tantra specifically used by those engaged in the practices of the Vajrabhairava Tantra. This practice is found in all of the Sarma Schools (Sakya, Kagyu, Gelug, etc.) however the Gelugpa Tradition hold Yama Dharmaraja in a special regard as one of their three main religious protectors along with the Shadbhuja form of Mahakala and Vaishravana.
  • God of wealth is believed to help eliminate poverty and create financial stability. It is a spiritual belief to be wealthy that helps to minimize misfortunes and obstacles and increase good fortune and happiness.
  • The honorific title by which he is generally known is Guru Rinpoche,  Precious Teacher. He usually sits on a lotus that sprang up in a small lake, wrapped in heavy, expensive robes, and wears a hat with its earflaps up. He posses a vajra in his right hand and a kapala (skull cup)  with a little jar of amrita in his left hand, and a khatvanga clamped against his left shoulder. He is flanked by his consorts, the  Indian princess Mandarava, who stands to his right, and Yeshe Tsogyal,  who stands to the left, the two favorite and tantrically most gifted of his five wives.
  • Mahakala is the wrathful emanation of the Buddha of Compassion appearing in the form of a Dharma Protector. Mahakala, known as Daheitian in Chinese, has two, four, or six arms. The two-armed Mahakala is the karma protector of the Karma Kagyu School. He has a wrathful expression to subdue inner demons. He is a symbol of fearlessness.
  • Mandala is a graphic and often symbolic pattern usually in the form of a circle divided into four separate sections or bearing multiple projections of an image. The mandala has reappeared in cultures and traditions throughout history, and the design and pattern it takes are often informed by the intended meaning of the piece. There are a number of traditional symbols used in mandala art that hail from Buddhist and Hindu imagery but many modern forms of mandala have begun incorporating modern takes on traditional symbols.
  • Manjushri is the Bodhisattva of Transcendent Wisdom. The youthful prince carries with his right hand the double-edged sword able to cut through illusion and with his left hand a blooming lotus that supports a volume of the Prajna-paramita Sutra. He is depicted as a youth of sixteen years in order to convey the Buddhist insight that wisdom is not a matter of mere experience or years, but results from the cultivation of intellectual genius, which can penetrate directly to the bedrock of reality. Wisdom is the most honored virtue in Buddhism, called the Mother of all Buddhas since only wisdom makes possible the great bliss of total freedom from all suffering that is the goal of all living beings. Thus, Manjushri is one of the most important of all Buddhist deities, the veritable god of wisdom and herald of emancipation
  • The knowledge of Tibetan Medicine, which is known for its effectiveness in treating not only physical but also mental illnesses, was written down about a thousand years ago in the book of the Four Medical Tantras. Medical Paintings is “one of the unique features of Traditional Tibetan Medicine is that it contains a comprehensive philosophy, cosmology, and system of subtle anatomy with associated spiritual practices”.
  • The Hindu religion contains many different variations of practice, and Sri Vidya contains elements of tantra or the pathway to understanding the self as a whole. Dedicated to Lalita as the goddess, Sri Vidya is focused on ways of uniting the self. The basic beliefs stem from the dualities that exist in the world and within ourselves; for example, the body and mind duality which, when at odds, can lead to a loss of equilibrium of self.Therefore, in order to reach an enlightened state of being, one must reconcile these dualities and accept their unity as a pathway to actualizing the self. In doing so, the self-becomes whole, which in turn allows the self to function within the energies of the universe.
  • Tara is a meditation deity whose practice is used by practitioners of the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism to develop certain inner qualities and understand outer, inner and secret teachings about compassion and emptiness. Tara may more properly be understood as different aspects of the same quality, as bodhisattvas are often considered metaphors for Buddhist virtues.
  • The name Tsongkhapa is derived from a great meditator of Bodhisattva. The thangkas under Tsongkhapa generally includes tree-like structure. In the painting like Lineage Tree and Karmapa Buddha is seen getting knowledge and power from a supreme force, which is Tsongkhapa.Lineage Tree and Karmapa, and Guru are the thangkas under this category.Tree Thangkas make beautiful, meaningful art. These thangkas varies widely. Some are called tree of life, while others are called lineage tree. Tree thangka includes four basic elements, earth, fire, water, and air.Karmapa is the king of Victor and formally he is known as the head of Karma.
  • The Bhavachakra, the Wheel of Life or Wheel of Becoming, is a mandala - a complex picture representing the Buddhist view of the universe. To Buddhists, existence is a cycle of life, death, rebirth, and suffering that they seek to escape altogether.