About Khandro Rinpoche

Mindrolling Jetsün Khandro Rinpoche is a lama in Tibetan Buddhism. Born in Kalimpong, India and the daughter of the late Mindrolling Trichen, Khandro Rinpoche was recognized by Rangjung Rigpe Dorje, 16th Karmapa at the age of two as the reincarnation of the Great Dakini of Tsurphu Monastery, Urgyen Tsomo, who was one of the most well-known female masters of her time. Khandro Urgyen Tsomo was the consort to Khakyab Dorje, 15th Karmapa Lama (1871–1922) and recognised in this Buddhist tradition as an incarnation of Yeshe Tsogyal. Her name is in fact her title, Khandro being Tibetan for dakini and rinpoche an honorific usually reserved for tulkus that means "precious one."
Buddhistdoor Global (BDG)
Lukhang Temple mural depicting Dzogchen anuyoga practices such as tummo which work with the subtle body channels

List of well-known Dzogchen Teachers

In the realm of contemporary Dogzen teachers, a diverse array of masters and practitioners offer profound teachings and guidance worldwide. Introduction to Dzogchen Teachings Dzogchen, often referred to as the "Great Perfection," is a profound teaching and meditation practice within Tibetan Buddhism. It emphasizes direct realization of one's true nature, known as rigpa, beyond conceptual frameworks and intellectual understanding. Considered the pinnacle of spiritual attainment, Dzogchen teaches that every being possesses intrinsic wisdom and purity, which can be .
Pema Lingpa's Visionary Journey to the Copper-Colored Mountain

The Tulku system & the preservation of Dharma lineages

A is a reincarnate custodian of a specific lineage of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism who is given empowerments and trained from a young age by students of his or her predecessor. Historically, the tulku system of preserving Dharma lineages operated in Tibet with the first being the . After the first Karmapa died in 1193, a lama had recurrent visions of a particular child as his rebirth. This child (born ca. 1205) was recognized as .
Eight Manifestations Of Guru Rinpoche

Nyingma Lamas – The decentralized network of practitioners

Nyingma traditional histories consider their teachings to trace back to the first Buddha Samantabhadra (Güntu Sangpo) and Indian mahasiddhas such as Garab Dorjé, Śrī Siṃha and Jñānasūtra. Traditional sources trace the origin of the Nyingma order in Tibet to figures associated with the initial introduction of Buddhism in the 8th century, such as , Yeshe Tsogyal, , , Buddhaguhya and Shantaraksita. Nyingma teachings are also known for having been passed down through networks of lay practitioners .