Retreat House of Sera Monastery and Lhasa valley

Hermitages and nunneries related to the Sera Monastery

The Sera Monastery is one of the “great three” Gelug university of Tibet, located 1.25 miles (2.01 km) north of Lhasa and about 5 km (3.1 mi) north of the Jokhang.

The other two monasteries are Ganden Monastery and Drepung Monastery.

The origin of the Sera Monastery is attributed to a fact that during its construction, the hill behind the monastery was covered with blooming wild roses.

Kyabje Rinpoche

Kyabje Khensur Kangurwa Lobsang Thubten Rinpoche, was a Buddhist monk, Abbot of Sera Jey Monastery, and the founder of Tibetan Buddhist Institute (Adelaide). Khensur means “former abbot” and Rinpoche means “precious teacher”.

Chupzang Nunnery

(Chu bzang dgon) is a historical nunnery, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa in Tibet, China. Though the site was established as a hermitage around 1665, it was converted into an exclusive nunnery in 1984 and has since grown into one of the largest nunneries in the Lhasa Valley.

Garu Nunnery

is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa, Lhasa Prefecture, in the Tibet region of China. The nunnery has an ancient history traced to Padmasambhava, the Indian Buddhist preceptor, who visited this location. He not only named the place as “Garu” but also ordained that it shall be a “Nunnery” not a monastery of monks on the basis of prophetic visions he had during his visit to the place. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, some nuns from the monasteries have made publicized demonstrations for Tibetan independence. Many of the protesting nuns were arrested, incarcerated, brutally handled and released only after protracted detention.

Negodong Nunnery

is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located in the northeastern Lhasa suburb known as Dodé Valley, northeast of Sera, Tibet. Buddhist scholar of the Sera Jé College’s Gomdé Regional House, Nam mkha’ rgyal mtshan. It was initially founded as a monastery with seventeen monks but later allotted for exclusive use as nunnery to provide personal security to the nuns who were then residing in a remote nunnery at Gnas nang, away from the present location at Gnas sgo gdong.

Purbuchok Hermitage

is a hermitage situated in the northeastern corner of the Lhasa Valley in the northern suburb of Dodé in the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. Destroyed by the Chinese in 1959, it was mostly restored in 1984. Affiliated to the Sera Monastery, it is the last hermitage to be visited on the “Sixth-Month Fourth-Day” pilgrimage circuit. The hills surrounding the monastery have been given name tags of the three protectors of the divine paradise namely the Avalokiteśvara, Manjusri and Vajrapani. It is also identified with the six-syllables divine mantra (sngags)- OM Mani Padme Hum.

Takten Hermitage

is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa in Tibet.

Sera Utsé Hermitage, Sera Utse, Sera Ütse, Sera Tse or Drubkjang Tse is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located on the mountain directly behind Sera Monastery itself, which is about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north of the Jokhang in Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. It is older than Sera Monastery.

Sera Gönpasar Hermitage is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa in Tibet.

Sera Chöding Hermitage, affiliated with Sera Monastery, is situated in Lhasa prefecture of Tibetan Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. It is located close to the Sera Monastery and faces south. The hermitage has a yellow house, which was originally built by the Tibetan Guru Tsongkhapa who spent many years there, spread over several occasions. It was his favourite meditating place and he wrote his great work, the “Great Commentary on the Prajñāmūla, while in residence. He also taught there. It is also known as the hermitage where Tsongkhapa entrusted his Tantric teachings to Rje shes rab seng ge (1383–1445), the founder of the Tantric Colleges.

Rakhadrak Hermitage

is a historical hermitage belonging to the Sera Monastery. It is northeast of Sera and north of Lhasa in Tibet Autonomous Region. It is just up the mountain from the .

Pabonka Hermitage

, also written Pawangka, is a historical hermitage, today belonging to Sera Monastery, about 8 kilometres northwest of Lhasa in the Nyang bran Valley on the slopes of Mount Parasol in Tibet.

Panglung Hermitage

is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa.

Drakri Hermitage

is a historic hermitage in Tibet, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) northeast of Lhasa, on a mountainside.

Nenang Monastery

Nénang Monastery is a historical gompa for Buddhist monks and nuns belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located west of Lhasa in Doilungdêqên County in Tibet Autonomous Region.

Khardo Hermitage

is a historical hermitage in Tibet, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa, in the Dodé Valley.

Keutsang Hermitage

Keutsang Hermitage is a historical hermitage, belonging to the Sera Monastery, about 8 kilometres (26,000 ft) northwest of Lhasa in Tibet Autonomous Region. The hermitage was in a precariously perched cave once inhabited by the great Tibetan guru Tsongkhapa. However, the original cave collapsed in a landslide. What is present now was rebuilt, adjoining the ruined Keutsang West Hermitage, at a safer location. As it exists now, Keutsang is to the east of Sera on a hillside above Lhasa’s principal cemetery. Rakhadrak Hermitage is above and close to this hermitage.

Keutsang East Hermitage

is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa in Tibet.

Trashi Chöling Hermitage is a historical hermitage, belonging to Sera Monastery. It is located north of Lhasa in Tibet.

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