About Sanchi

Sanchi Stupa is a Buddhist complex, famous for its Great Stupa, on a hilltop at Sanchi Town in Raisen District of the State of Madhya Pradesh, India. It is located in 46 kilometres (29 mi) north-east of Bhopal, capital of Madhya Pradesh. The Great Stupa at Sanchi is one of the oldest stone structures in India, and an important monument of Indian Architecture. It was originally commissioned by the emperor Ashoka in the 3rd century BCE. Its nucleus was a simple hemispherical brick structure built over the relics of the Buddha. It was crowned by the chhatri, a parasol-like structure symbolising high rank, which was intended to honour and shelter the relics. The original construction work of this stupa was overseen by Ashoka, whose wife Devi was the daughter of a merchant of nearby Vidisha. Sanchi was also her birthplace as well as the venue of her and Ashoka's wedding. In the 1st century BCE, four elaborately carved toranas and a balustrade encircling the entire structure were added. The Sanchi Stupa built during Mauryan period was made of bricks. The composite flourished until the 11th century.

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Sanchi Stupa No.2, the earliest known stupa with important displays of decorative reliefs, circa 125 BCE

Buddhist Stupas in India – The earliest Buddhist buildings

Religious buildings in the form of the Buddhist stupa, a dome shaped monument, started to be used in India as commemorative associated with storing sacred relics of the Buddha. The earliest archaeological evidence for the presence of Buddhist dates to the late 4th century BCE. In India, , Sarnath, Amaravati and are among the oldest known stupas. After the parinirvana of the Buddha, his remains were cremated and the ashes divided and buried .
13th century copy of the Taima Mandala. Japan, Kamakura period.

Buddhist art – The devotional artistic practices

Buddhist is the artistic practices that are influenced by . It includes art media which depict Buddhas, bodhisattvas, and other entities, notable Buddhist figures, both historical and mythical, narrative scenes from the lives of all of these, and other graphic aids to practice, as well as physical objects associated with Buddhist practice, such as vajras, bells, stupas and Buddhist temple architecture. Buddhist art originated on the Indian subcontinent following the historical life .
Relics of buddha from the Supreme Patriarch of Thailand

Buddhist relics – The ashes of spiritual Masters

Śarīra is a generic term referring to Buddhist relics, although in common usage it usually refers to pearl or crystal-like bead-shaped objects that are purportedly found among the cremated ashes of Buddhist spiritual masters. Relics of the Buddha after cremation are termed dhātu in the Mahaparinibbana Sutta. Śarīra are held to emanate or incite 'blessings' and 'grace' within the mindstream and experience of those connected to them. Sarira are also believed to ward off evil .
"Great Buddha Statue" at Bodh Gaya

Historical Buddhist pilgrimage sites in India

In religion and spirituality, a pilgrimage is a long journey or search of great moral significance. Sometimes, it is a journey to a sacred place or to a shrine of importance to a person's beliefs and faith. Members of every major religion participate in pilgrimages. A person who makes such a journey is called a pilgrim. Among the four major sites of pilgrimage one is in Nepal: - Lumbini, where Buddha was born and the three .