About Azusa Yumi

An azusa yumi is a sacred bow (yumi) used in certain Shinto rituals in Japan, as well as a Japanese musical bow, made from the wood of the Japanese azusa or Japanese cherry birch tree. Playing an azusa yumi forms part of some Shinto rituals; in Japan, it is universally believed that merely the twanging of the bowstring will frighten ghosts and evil spirits away from a house. In Japanese poetry, the word azusa yumi functions as a makurakotoba.
A Thai Dhamma wheel at Wat Phothivihan, Tumpat, Kelantan

Buddhist symbolism – From representation to auspiciousness

is the use of to represent certain aspects of the Buddha's Dharma (teaching). Early Buddhist symbols which remain important today include the Dharma wheel, the Indian lotus, the three jewels and the Bodhi tree. Anthropomorphic symbolism depicting the Buddha (as well as other figures) became very popular around the first century CE with the arts of Mathura and the Greco-Buddhist art of Gandhara. New symbols continued to develop into the medieval period, .
The inner altar with the painted scroll of the Buddha

Buddhist ritual implements – Items of outer devotion

Most Buddhists use ritual in pursuit of their spiritual aspirations. Common devotional practices are receiving a blessing, making merit, making a resolution, prostrating, making offerings, chanting traditional texts and pilgrimage. regards inner devotion as more important than outer ritual. However, rituals do have an important place in Buddhism. Buddhist rituals take place through several practices, expressed through physical movement, speech, and mind. This is a list of Buddhist ritual implements used in some Buddhist .
The actions of priests at the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo have generated controversy across East Asia

Shinto religious objects – The Kami worship

There is no universally agreed definition of Shinto. However some scholars define Shinto as the belief in "kami", the supernatural entities at the centre of the religion. Shinto encompasses doctrines, institutions, ritual, and communal life based on kami worship. Various scholars have referred to practitioners of Shinto as Shintoists, although this term has no direct translation in the Japanese language. This is a list of some religious objects used for the practice of .