About Shuin

A shuin is a seal stamp given to worshippers and visitors to Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan. The seal stamps are often collected in books called shuinchō (朱印帳) that are sold at shrines and temples.
A Thai Dhamma wheel at Wat Phothivihan, Tumpat, Kelantan

Buddhist symbolism – From representation to auspiciousness

is the use of to represent certain aspects of the Buddha's Dharma (teaching). Early Buddhist symbols which remain important today include the Dharma wheel, the Indian lotus, the three jewels and the Bodhi tree. Anthropomorphic symbolism depicting the Buddha (as well as other figures) became very popular around the first century CE with the arts of Mathura and the Greco-Buddhist art of Gandhara. New symbols continued to develop into the medieval period, .
The actions of priests at the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo have generated controversy across East Asia

Shinto religious objects – The Kami worship

There is no universally agreed definition of Shinto. However some scholars define Shinto as the belief in "kami", the supernatural entities at the centre of the religion. Shinto encompasses doctrines, institutions, ritual, and communal life based on kami worship. Various scholars have referred to practitioners of Shinto as Shintoists, although this term has no direct translation in the Japanese language. This is a list of some religious objects used for the practice of .