About Madhyamaka

Madhyamaka also known as Śūnyavāda and Niḥsvabhāvavāda refers to a tradition of Buddhist philosophy and practice founded by the Indian philosopher Nāgārjuna. The foundational text of the Mādhyamaka tradition is Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā. More broadly, Madhyamaka also refers to the ultimate nature of phenomena and the realization of this in meditative equipoise.
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Venerable Thubten Chodron

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Acarya Bhavaviveka converting a nonbeliever to buddhism

Bhāviveka – The founder of the Svātantrika tradition of the Mādhyamaka school

, also known as Bhavya or Bhāvaviveka, was a 6th century . In , Bhāviveka is considered the founder of the Svātantrika tradition of the Mādhyamaka school, which is considered to be an antagonist of the Prāsaṅgika Madhyamaka. The Madhyamaka school The Madhyamaka school, also known as the "" school, is a major tradition within Indian . The Madhyamaka , as propounded by the Indian Nāgārjuna in the 2nd century, asserts .
Dalai Lama speaking on the first day of his teaching on Chandrakirti 2022

The Dalai Lama’s views on the Madhyamaka

This article is about the 's on the The  also referred as "". It is based on the belief that all things are interconnected and interdependent, and that therefore no one thing can be considered in isolation. The Dalai 's views on the "Middle Way" This article discusses the Dalai Lama's views on the Middle Way Approach, a which advocates for a balanced and moderate approach to life. While addressing the congregation at the .
Kuījī, also known as Ji, an exponent of Yogācāra, was a Chinese monk and a prominent disciple of Xuanzang. His posthumous name was Cí'ēn dàshī, The Great Teacher of Cien Monastery, after the Daci'en Temple or Great Monastery of Compassionate Grace, which was located in Chang'an, the main capital of the Tang Dynasty. The Giant Wild Goose Pagoda was built in Daci'en Temple in 652. According to biographies, he was sent to the imperial translation bureau headed by Xuanzang, from whom he later would learn Sanskrit, Abhidharma, and Yogācāra.

The nature of reality, consciousness and compassion

Imagine you're in a room filled with , each reflecting a slightly different version of yourself. As you look around, it's challenging to determine which reflection is the real "you". Are you the image closest to the mirror's surface, or is the true "you" hidden within the depths of the glass? This intriguing scenario mirrors a fundamental philosophical question that has puzzled scholars and thinkers for centuries: the nature of reality and . The 's .
Tsonkapa, 16th century, Collection of Rubin Museum of Art

Rangtong – The nature of emptiness

Rangtong is the majority Tibetan teaching on the nature of śūnyatā or "emptiness", namely that all phenomena are empty of a self-nature in both the relative and absolute sense, without positing anything beyond that. This position is the mainstream Tibetan interpretation of , especially by the followers of Prasaṅgika Mādhyamaka. Tsongkhapa (1357–1419), who also wrote in response to shentong, is the most outspoken defendant of rangtong. He saw emptiness as a consequence of dependent designation, the .
1st Karmapa Dusum Khyenpa Thangka Painting

1st Karmapa Lama – Dusum Kyenpa

Dusum Khyenpa is known as the 1st . Dusum Khyenpa is the founder of the (Kamtsang) branch of the Tradition. Dusum Khyenpa was born in Kham He served as Abbot of after and founded the . He is becoming the seat of the incarnate Karmapa . Dusum Khyenpa was the founder of the school and of its three main : Kampo Nenang Gon in 1164, Karma Gon .

Explaining Gelug Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism

The is the newest of the schools of . It was founded by a philosopher and . Gelug Lineage's field for the Accumulation of Merit with Tsongkapa at the Center is surrounded by the incarnation lineage above and with meditational deities, Confession , and protectors below. In the Gelug Tradition of Tibetan , there are numerous Refuge Field types distinguished both by the central figure .

Explaining Buddhist Protector Four Faced Mahakala – Chaturmukha Thangka

Depicting , Chaturmukha who was known as the Four-faced Great Black One. Mahakala was associated with the Guhyasamaja along with the Twenty-five and Fifty Chapter Mahakala Tantras. The Life of Chaturmukha Mahakala In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Mahakala, after that, we will learn about the short etymological description of the word Mahakala itself. Etymology of Chaturmukha Mahakala Earlier, we learn about the life of Caturmukha Mahakala. Now, we are going .
Yogambara Thangka

Interpreting Yogambara

is also belonging to the -mother. He is also belonging to the classification of which is made by the famous in the text a compendium of practices of the Indian Pandita and also through the tradition of and Ngog . The Viability of Yogambara In this section, we are going to learn about the viability of Yogambara, after the short etymological description of the word Yogambara itself. Etymology of Yogambara Yogambara .

The Magic of Composition in Tibetan paintings

By the the painter sat down to begin the sketch he already had in the main contents and of the . Usually, the patron had indicated to the painter precisely which deities he wanted to be depicted. Sometimes the patron also furnished a diagram that showe the names and relative positions of each figure in the , such diagrams often having been composed by the of the patron. When the patron provided .

The 4 Phases of The Development of Buddhism in India

was introduced to Indians by who lived in in the sixth century BCE, a of boom of and philosophical thought from Greece to . Born as the crown prince of the great Kingdom, the youth was prepared to be a in accordance with the wishes of his royal father. However, at the age of 28 years old, he learned of the deep experienced in life by most .