About Rangtong-Shentong

Rangtong and shentong are two distinctive views on emptiness (sunyata) and the two truths doctrine within Tibetan Buddhism.
Thangkha with Jonang lama Dolpopa Sherab Gyaltsen (1292–1361)

Shentong – Reconciling Madhyama with the Buddha-nature

The notion of sentong grew out the Tibetan attempts to reconcile the contradiction between the Madhyama stance on the emptiness of phenomena, and the later notion of an eternal . Shentong views the two truths doctrine as distinguishing between relative and absolute reality, agreeing that relative reality is empty of self-nature, but stating that absolute reality is "empty" (Wylie: stong) only of "other" (Wylie: gzhan) relative phenomena, but is itself not empty. This absolute reality is .
Samantabhadra, surrounded by numerous peaceful and fierce deities.

Tibetan Buddhist philosophical concepts you must know

In Tibetan Buddhist scholasticism, Buddhist philosophy is traditionally propounded according to a hierarchical classification of four classical Indian philosophical schools, known as the "four tenets" (drubta shyi). While the classical tenets-system is limited to four tenets (Vaibhāṣika, Sautrāntika, Yogācāra, and Madhyamaka), there are further sub-classifications within these different tenets. This classification does not include Theravada, the only surviving of the 18 classical schools of . It also does not include other Indian Buddhist schools, such as .
Dorje Neljorma

Vajrayogini Dakini – Origin, Lineages and Iconography

is a deity who is also called as Vajravarahi in , or , a tradition in which she is considered the supreme deity more revered than any male . She represents the path leading to female . She is also a , a term that describes a female supernatural being or an accomplished , and is considered the queen of the dakinis. Her name comes from the , , which means “diamond” or “thunderbolt,” .