About Chöd

Chöd, is a found primarily in the and schools of . Also known as “Cutting Through the Ego,”, the practices are based on the Prajñāpāramitā or “Perfection of , which expound the “emptiness” concept of .

A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .
Buddha Amitayus in his Pure Land Sukhavati.

Dzogchen practices – Awakening rigpa

Dzogchen ("Great Perfection" or "Great Completion"), also known as atiyoga (utmost yoga), is a tradition of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism aimed at discovering and continuing in the ultimate ground of existence. The primordial ground is said to have the qualities of purity (i.e. emptiness), spontaneity (lhun grub, associated with luminous clarity) and compassion (thugs rje). The goal of Dzogchen is knowledge of this basis, this knowledge is called rigpa (Skt. vidyā). There are numerous spiritual .
Manjuvajra Embracing His Consort

Tantric practices – The esoteric South Asian traditions

Tantra are the esoteric traditions of and Buddhism that developed in South Asia from the middle of the 1st millennium CE onwards. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice. A key feature of these traditions is the use of mantras, and thus they are commonly referred to as Mantramārga ("Path of Mantra") in Hinduism or Mantrayāna ("Mantra Vehicle") and Guhyamantra ("Secret .
Lukhang Temple mural depicting Dzogchen anuyoga practices such as tummo which work with the subtle body channels

Dzogchen – Tradition of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism

Dzogchen or "Great Perfection", Sanskrit: अतियोग, is a tradition of teachings in Tibetan aimed at discovering and continuing in the natural primordial state of being. Dzogchen developed in the Tibetan Empire period and the Era of Fragmentation (9th-11th centuries) and continues to be practiced today both in Tibet and around the world. It is a central teaching of the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism and of Bon. In these traditions, Dzogchen is the highest .
Samantabhadra, surrounded by numerous peaceful and fierce deities.

Tibetan Buddhist philosophical concepts you must know

In Tibetan Buddhist scholasticism, Buddhist philosophy is traditionally propounded according to a hierarchical classification of four classical Indian philosophical schools, known as the "four tenets" (drubta shyi). While the classical tenets-system is limited to four tenets (Vaibhāṣika, Sautrāntika, Yogācāra, and Madhyamaka), there are further sub-classifications within these different tenets. This classification does not include Theravada, the only surviving of the 18 classical schools of . It also does not include other Indian Buddhist schools, such as .

Lion Faced Dakini – Singhamukha Yogini

Lion-faced is a secret form of also has a relationship to Troma and the practice of . She is appropriate for clearing obstacles of the most pervasive and malignant kind and cutting through the “” of . This practice has been important in since the of . PeGyal Lingpa received this revelation directly from , appearing in a red-black form, instead of the more common dark blue .