About Dakini

Dakani is female spirits, witches, and deities.
The concept of the ḍākinī differs depending on the context and the tradition. A ḍākinī in Hinduism is a demon and in Buddhism is a type of female spirit. In Japan it is difficult to trace the exact origins of the Japanese Dakiniten cult but it flourished mainly via the network of Inari worship and vice versa.

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Temple banner depicting a dancing tantric goddess flanked by bird-headed ḍākinīs

Dakinis – The blissful wisdom of tantric transformation

The concept of the ḍākinī somewhat differs depending on the context and the tradition. In Nepalese and Tibetan Buddhism, can refer to both what can be best described as fierce-looking female embodiments of enlightened energy and to human women with a certain amount of spiritual development, both of which can help Tantric initiates attaining enlightenment. The ḍākinī appears in a Vajrayana formulation of the Buddhist refuge formula known as the Three Roots. Sometimes she .

Wisdom Dakini Machig Labdron

Machig Labdron is a founder of the Cho Tradition of . Machig Labdron was a renowned 11th-century practitioner, teacher, and who originated several Tibetan lineages of the practice of Chod. Machig Labdron may have come from a family and, according to , developed Chod by combining native with the . Machig Labdron may have come from a Bon family and, according to Namkhai Norbu, developed .
Dorje Neljorma

Vajrayogini Dakini – Origin, Lineages and Iconography

is a deity who is also called as Vajravarahi in , or , a tradition in which she is considered the supreme deity more revered than any male . She represents the path leading to female . She is also a , a term that describes a female supernatural being or an accomplished , and is considered the queen of the dakinis. Her name comes from the , , which means “diamond” or “thunderbolt,” .
Mandarava Thangka Painting

Long Life Dakini Mandarava

is also known as The Long Life Mandarava. Mandarava was the virtuous, and beautiful princess daughter of the royal couple in Zahor. Mandarava is also known as, , . She is along with . She is one of the two principal consorts of great 8th century Indian teacher , a founder-figure of , described as a '' by many practitioners. Birth Place of Mandarava Mandarava was born to a .

Lion Faced Dakini – Singhamukha Yogini

Lion-faced is a secret form of also has a relationship to Troma and the practice of . She is appropriate for clearing obstacles of the most pervasive and malignant kind and cutting through the “” of . This practice has been important in since the of . PeGyal Lingpa received this revelation directly from , appearing in a red-black form, instead of the more common dark blue .
A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .
Manjuvajra Embracing His Consort

Tantric practices – The esoteric South Asian traditions

Tantra are the esoteric traditions of and Buddhism that developed in South Asia from the middle of the 1st millennium CE onwards. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice. A key feature of these traditions is the use of mantras, and thus they are commonly referred to as Mantramārga ("Path of Mantra") in Hinduism or Mantrayāna ("Mantra Vehicle") and Guhyamantra ("Secret .
Mandala of the five Buddha families, Tibet, 19th century

Tibetan Buddhist deities – The Vajrayana Pantheon

Mahayana Buddhists venerate numerous Buddhas. In Tibetan Buddhism, following the Vajrayana Buddhist tradition, the major bodhisattvas are known as the "eight great bodhisattvas", Ksitigarbha, Vajrapani, Akasagarbha, Avalokitesvara, Maitreya, Sarvanivāraṇaviṣkambhin, Samantabhadra and Manjushri. Each is associated with a different consort, direction, aggregate (or, aspect of the personality), emotion, element, color, symbol, and mount. Other female Bodhisattvas include and Cundi. Followers of Tibetan Buddhism consider reborn tulkus such as the Dalai Lamas and the Karmapas to be .
The Five Wisdom Kings is the most important grouping of Wisdom Kings (Vidyaraja)

Buddhist deities – Conceptual and metaphoric refuge

includes a wide array of divine beings that are venerated in various ritual and popular contexts. Initially they included mainly Indian figures such as devas, asuras and , but later came to include other Asian spirits and local gods. They range from enlightened Buddhas to regional spirits adopted by Buddhists or practiced on the margins of the religion. The Pali Canon and others suggest that the Buddha taught that belief in a Creator deity .