About Mahakala

Mahakala is a deity common to Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism. According to Hinduism, Mahakala is a manifestation of Shiva and is the consort of Hindu Goddess Kali and most prominently appears in Kalikula sect of Shaktism. Mahākāla also appears as a protector deity known as a dharmapala in Vajrayana Buddhism, particularly most Tibetan traditions (Citipati), in Tangmi and in Shingon. He is known as Dàhēitiān and Daaih'hāktīn (大黑天) in Mandarin and Cantonese, Daeheukcheon (대흑천) in Korean and Daikokuten (大黒天) in Japanese. In Sikhism, Mahākāla is referred to as Kal, who is the governor of Maya.

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Black Mahakala Statue Real Gold and Thangka Color

All about Wisdom Protector – Mahakala

is a male deity. He is the protector deity known as a in , especially most traditions, in Tangmi and in Japanese Esoteric . Maha literally translates as great and Kala signifies or death, hence Mahakala means "beyond the time" or "Great Black One". Mahakala is a protector deity and specifically the primary Protector of and . In some cases, Mahakala can also be a meditational .

All you need to know about Brahmarupa Mahakala

Brahmarupa is the outer form of Chaturmukha Mahakala.  He is the special protector of the Guhyasamaja and the 2nd main protector of the School. Brahmarupa, a benign form of the wrathful deity Mahakala, is shown as a bearded nomadic ascetic, sitting on a corpse, wearing a bone apron, and holding a thighbone trumpet and a skull cup. A protector of the Sakya school of , he is credited with introducing the  .

Interpreting Buddhist Protector Panjarnata Mahakala

Panjarnata is the protector of the cycle of . The and of Panjarnata Mahakala are found in the 18th chapter of the Panjara Tantra which an exclusive 'explanatory tantra' to the Hevajra Tantra itself. Life of Panjarnata Mahakala In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Panjarnata Mahakala, after that, the short etymological description of the word  Panjarnata Mahakala itself. Panjarnata Mahakala is the main protector of the .

Explaining Buddhist Protector Four Faced Mahakala – Chaturmukha Thangka

Depicting , Chaturmukha who was known as the Four-faced Great Black One. Mahakala was associated with the Guhyasamaja along with the Twenty-five and Fifty Chapter Mahakala Tantras. The Life of Chaturmukha Mahakala In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Mahakala, after that, we will learn about the short etymological description of the word Mahakala itself. Etymology of Chaturmukha Mahakala Earlier, we learn about the life of Caturmukha Mahakala. Now, we are going .
A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .

Buddhist tantras – Manipulation of the subtle body

The Buddhist Tantras are a varied group of Indian and Tibetan texts which outline unique views and practices of the Buddhist tantra religious systems. Buddhist Tantric texts began appearing in the Gupta Empire period though there are texts with elements associated with Tantra that can be seen as early as the third century. By the eighth century, Tantra was a dominant force in North India and the number of texts increased with numerous Tantric pandits writing .

Herukas – The unified consciousness with emptiness

, is the name of a category of , enlightened beings in Vajrayana Buddhism that adopt a fierce countenance to benefit sentient beings. In East Asia, these are called Wisdom Kings. represent the embodiment of indivisible bliss and emptiness. They appear as Iṣṭha-devatā or meditational for tantric sādhanā, usually placed in a mandala and often appearing in Yab-Yum. Heruka represents wrathful imagery with indivisible emptiness (śūnyatā), bliss, peace, wisdom, compassion (bodhicitta), and love. .
Tibetan (Citipati mask depicting Mahākāla

Dharmapalas – Defenders of the Justice

A dharmapāla is a type of wrathful god in Buddhism. The name means "dharma protector" in Sanskrit, and the dharmapālas are also known as the Defenders of the Justice (Dharma), or the Guardians of the Law. There are two kinds of , Worldly Guardians () and Wisdom Protectors (jnanapala). Only Wisdom Protectors are enlightened beings. In Vajrayana iconography and thangka depictions, dharmapala are fearsome beings, often with many heads, many hands, or many feet. Dharmapala .
1st Karmapa Dusum Khyenpa Thangka Painting

1st Karmapa Lama – Dusum Kyenpa

Dusum Khyenpa is known as the 1st . Dusum Khyenpa is the founder of the (Kamtsang) branch of the Tradition. Dusum Khyenpa was born in Kham He served as Abbot of after and founded the . He is becoming the seat of the incarnate Karmapa . Dusum Khyenpa was the founder of the school and of its three main monasteries: Kampo Nenang Gon in 1164, Karma Gon .