About Guhyasamāja Tantra

The Guhyasamāja is one of the most important of . In its fullest form, it consists of seventeen chapters, though a separate “explanatory tantra” (vyākhyātantra) known as the Later Tantra is sometimes considered to be its eighteenth chapter. Many scholars believe that the original core of the consisted of the first twelve chapters, with chapters thirteen to seventeen being added later as explanatory material.

A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .

Buddhist tantras – Manipulation of the subtle body

The Buddhist Tantras are a varied group of Indian and Tibetan texts which outline unique views and practices of the Buddhist tantra religious systems. Buddhist Tantric texts began appearing in the Gupta Empire period though there are texts with elements associated with Tantra that can be seen as early as the third century. By the eighth century, Tantra was a dominant force in North India and the number of texts increased with numerous Tantric pandits writing .

All about Guhyasamaja Tantra

Guhyasamja is one of 's most fascinating, difficult, and essential personalities. It combines various important , into one sculpture. It is predominantly is call Akshobhayavajara which is the form of Akshobhaya buddha. Guhyasamja is the foremost meditational deity of the Method-father class of . Guhyasamaja has two main traditions, the Arya () Lineage, and the (Jnanapada) Lineage. There are three principal iconographic of Guhyasamaja; Akshobhyavajra (blue), (orange), .

All you need to know about Brahmarupa Mahakala

Brahmarupa is the outer form of Chaturmukha Mahakala.  He is the special protector of the Guhyasamaja and the 2nd main protector of the School. Brahmarupa, a benign form of the wrathful deity Mahakala, is shown as a bearded nomadic ascetic, sitting on a corpse, wearing a bone apron, and holding a thighbone trumpet and a skull cup. A protector of the Sakya school of , he is credited with introducing the  .

Interpreting Buddhist Protector Panjarnata Mahakala

Panjarnata is the protector of the cycle of . The and of Panjarnata Mahakala are found in the 18th chapter of the Panjara Tantra which an exclusive 'explanatory tantra' to the Hevajra Tantra itself. Life of Panjarnata Mahakala In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Panjarnata Mahakala, after that, the short etymological description of the word  Panjarnata Mahakala itself. Panjarnata Mahakala is the main protector of the .

Explaining Lama Teacher Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyaltsen

PanditaKunga Gyeltsen was a and scholar and the fourth of the Five Sakya Forefathers. He is held in the tradition to have been an emanation of Manjusri, the embodiment of the of all the . The Viability of Kunga Gyaltsen In this portion, we are going to talk about the life of Sakya PanditaKunga Gyeltsen. After a short etymological description of the word Sakya PanditaKunga Gyeltsen itself, we will .

Explaining Buddhist Protector Four Faced Mahakala – Chaturmukha Thangka

Depicting , Chaturmukha who was known as the Four-faced Great Black One. Mahakala was associated with the Guhyasamaja along with the Twenty-five and Fifty Chapter Mahakala Tantras. The Life of Chaturmukha Mahakala In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Mahakala, after that, we will learn about the short etymological description of the word Mahakala itself. Etymology of Chaturmukha Mahakala Earlier, we learn about the life of Caturmukha Mahakala. Now, we are going .

Buddha Vairocana – The embodiment of Dharmakaya

is a who has also known as the embodiment of Dharmakaya and therefore can be seen as the universal aspect of the historical . In Sino-Japanese , he seems to the embodiment of the concept of shunyata or Emptiness. In the fifth Buddhism Conception of , he is at the center. His consort is . The Vairocana statue in Nara's Todai-Ji which is located in is the largest .

Explaining Vajrabhairava

with the consort Vetali surrounded by the main protectors of the Gelugpa School. Vajrabhairava is also called as . He is a meditational deity of the Classification of . As the supreme meditational deity of the Tradition Vajrabhairava is also looked upon as the Lord or . The life of Vajrabhairava In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Vajrabhairava, after the short etymological description of .
Vajradhara Thangka

Interpreting Vajradhara – The Father of Tantras

According to the and schools of , is also known as the ultimate Primordial or Adi Buddha. Vajradhara displaced who remains the Primordial Buddha in the or School and the school. However, the two are metaphysically equivalent. The Esse of Vajradhara In this portion, we are going to learn about the ease of Vajradhara, after the short etymological description of the word Vajradhara itself. Etymology of Vajradhara Vajradhara is .