About Ekajati

Ekajaṭī or Ekajaṭā,, also known as Māhacīnatārā, is one of the 21 . Ekajati is, along with deity, one of the most powerful and fierce of mythology.

According to legends, her right eye was pierced by the so that she could much more effectively help him subjugate Tibetan demons.

18th-century Eastern Tibetan thanka, with the Green Tara (Samaya Tara Yogini) in the center and the Blue, Red, White and Yellow taras in the corners

The common forms of Tara – Karuṇā, Mettā & Shunyata

, Ārya Tārā, or Shayama Tara, also known as Jetsun Dölma is an important figure in Buddhism, especially revered in Tibetan Buddhism. She appears as a female bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism, and as a female Buddha in Vajrayana Buddhism. She is known as the "mother of liberation", and represents the virtues of success in work and achievements. She is known as Duōluó Púsà (多羅菩薩) in Chinese Buddhism, and as Tara Bosatsu (多羅菩薩) in Japan. Tārā is .
A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .

Buddhist tantras – Manipulation of the subtle body

The Buddhist Tantras are a varied group of Indian and Tibetan texts which outline unique views and practices of the Buddhist tantra religious systems. Buddhist Tantric texts began appearing in the Gupta Empire period though there are texts with elements associated with Tantra that can be seen as early as the third century. By the eighth century, Tantra was a dominant force in North India and the number of texts increased with numerous Tantric pandits writing .
Tibetan (Citipati mask depicting Mahākāla

Dharmapalas – Defenders of the Justice

A dharmapāla is a type of wrathful god in Buddhism. The name means "dharma protector" in Sanskrit, and the dharmapālas are also known as the Defenders of the Justice (Dharma), or the Guardians of the Law. There are two kinds of , Worldly Guardians () and Wisdom Protectors (jnanapala). Only Wisdom Protectors are enlightened beings. In Vajrayana iconography and thangka depictions, dharmapala are fearsome beings, often with many heads, many hands, or many feet. Dharmapala .
Lukhang Temple mural depicting Dzogchen anuyoga practices such as tummo which work with the subtle body channels

Dzogchen – Tradition of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism

Dzogchen or "Great Perfection", Sanskrit: अतियोग, is a tradition of teachings in Tibetan aimed at discovering and continuing in the natural primordial state of being. Dzogchen developed in the Tibetan Empire period and the Era of Fragmentation (9th-11th centuries) and continues to be practiced today both in Tibet and around the world. It is a central teaching of the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism and of Bon. In these traditions, Dzogchen is the highest .
1st Karmapa Dusum Khyenpa Thangka Painting

1st Karmapa Lama – Dusum Kyenpa

Dusum Khyenpa is known as the 1st . Dusum Khyenpa is the founder of the (Kamtsang) branch of the Tradition. Dusum Khyenpa was born in Kham He served as Abbot of after and founded the . He is becoming the seat of the incarnate Karmapa . Dusum Khyenpa was the founder of the school and of its three main monasteries: Kampo Nenang Gon in 1164, Karma Gon .

Deity and Divinities of Nyingma Tradition

Tradition is the old school of is the name given to the followers of those original translations of the of the into . The Nyingma teachings are divided into the Long Transmission (Tib. ring gyü) of the and the Short Transmission (Tib. nyé gyü) of Terma; other teachings were received by directly in Pure Visions (Tib. dak nang) from deities or , in experiences or in dreams. Particular to .

Interpreting Buddhist Protector Panjarnata Mahakala

Panjarnata is the protector of the cycle of . The and of Panjarnata Mahakala are found in the 18th chapter of the Panjara Tantra which an exclusive 'explanatory tantra' to the Hevajra Tantra itself. Life of Panjarnata Mahakala In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Panjarnata Mahakala, after that, the short etymological description of the word  Panjarnata Mahakala itself. Panjarnata Mahakala is the main protector of the .

Interpreting Blue Tara Ekajati

is  Mahacinatara also known as one of the 21 . Ekajati is along with deity is one of the most powerful and fierce of . Ekajati is the protector of secret and "as the mother of the mothers of all the " represents the ultimate unity.  She is the most important protector of the Vajrayana , especially the and terms. The of the Deity Ekajati In this .

Explaining Buddhist Deity Green Tara

is a female and one of the most well-known in women. She is known as an being ready to take action to benefit sentient. The color green represents the wind element. She moves quickly as the wind to help others. The life of the Green In this section, we are going to talk about the life of Green tara, after the short etymological description of the word Green Tara .