About Wrathful deities

In Buddhism, wrathful deities or fierce deities are the fierce, wrathful or forceful forms of enlightened Buddhas, Bodhisattvas or Devas. Because of their power to destroy the obstacles to enlightenment, they are also termed krodha-vighnantaka, "Wrathful onlookers on destroying obstacles". Wrathful deities are a notable feature of the iconography of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. These types of deities first appeared in India during the late 6th century with its main source being the Yaksha imagery and became a central feature of Indian Tantric Buddhism by the late 10th or early 11th century.

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The Five Wisdom Kings is the most important grouping of Wisdom Kings (Vidyaraja)

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Herukas – The unified consciousness with emptiness

, is the name of a category of , enlightened beings in Vajrayana Buddhism that adopt a fierce countenance to benefit sentient beings. In East Asia, these are called Wisdom Kings. represent the embodiment of indivisible bliss and emptiness. They appear as Iṣṭha-devatā or meditational for tantric sādhanā, usually placed in a mandala and often appearing in Yab-Yum. Heruka represents wrathful imagery with indivisible emptiness (śūnyatā), bliss, peace, wisdom, compassion (bodhicitta), and love. .

All you need to know about Brahmarupa Mahakala

Brahmarupa is the outer form of Chaturmukha Mahakala.  He is the special protector of the Guhyasamaja and the 2nd main protector of the School. Brahmarupa, a benign form of the wrathful deity Mahakala, is shown as a bearded nomadic ascetic, sitting on a corpse, wearing a bone apron, and holding a thighbone trumpet and a skull cup. A protector of the Sakya school of , he is credited with introducing the  .

Interpreting Indian Adept Avadhutipa – Maitripa

Avadhutipa is also known as Maitripa who is an important figure both in and . It is through him that and ’s crucial on nature, the Uttara , became widely followed in . He also transmitted the esoteric aspect of buddha nature, embodied in the , which treat the topic of in great detail and provide a wide range of progressive, highly-refined . The life of the Indian .

Interpreting Bodhisattva Samantabhadra Buddha

is known as Universal Worthy is a in associated with practice and . Samantabhadra is most commonly described as a bodhisattva himself, although some Buddhist traditions, namely the Nyingmapa, regard him as a primordial in indivisible union with his consort Samantabhadri. The Life of Samantabadra Buddha In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Samantabhadra Buddha. After that, we will learn the short etymological .

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Shri is not one entity or personality. Depending on the form of Shri Devi she could be a wrathful emanation of a number of different deities such as Shri Devi Magzor Gyalmo is the wrathful form of Sarasvati. Some of Shri Devi with four arms such as Dudusolma are the wrathful form of Shri . There are dozens of different variations and forms of Shri Devi. Shri Devi wrathful with one face and .

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Final Touch and Finishing Details In a Traditional Thangka Paintings

Facial Features The last main step involving the application of colours was the rendering of the faces of the . This was in effect the final stage of outlining, and sometimes a painter would step in at this point and complete the of his student. Of all the finishing details, the facial features demanded the most attention, and among these it was the eyes that received the greatest care. The painting of the .