About Samadhi

Samādhi, also called , in , , Jainism, Sikhism and yogic schools refers to a state of meditative . In the Yogic traditions, and the commentarial tradition on which the Burmese Vipassana movement and the Thai Forest tradition rely, it is a meditative absorption or trance, attained by the practice of dhyāna. In the oldest Buddhist suttas, on which several contemporary western Theravada teachers rely, it refers to the development of a luminous which is equanimous and mindful.

The early Buddhist tradition also taught other meditation postures, such as the standing posture and the lion posture performed lying down on one side.

Buddhist meditation – The path toward liberation

Buddhists pursue as part of the path toward liberation from defilements (kleshas) and clinging and craving (upādāna), also called awakening, which results in the attainment of Nirvana, and includes a variety of meditation techniques such as: - asubha ("reflections on repulsiveness") - reflection on pratityasamutpada (dependent origination) - sati () and (recollections), including (breath meditation) - dhyana (developing an alert and luminous mind) - the Brahma-viharas (loving-kindness and compassion) These techniques aim to develop equanimity .
Manjuvajra Embracing His Consort

Tantric practices – The esoteric South Asian traditions

Tantra are the esoteric traditions of and Buddhism that developed in South Asia from the middle of the 1st millennium CE onwards. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice. A key feature of these traditions is the use of mantras, and thus they are commonly referred to as Mantramārga ("Path of Mantra") in Hinduism or Mantrayāna ("Mantra Vehicle") and Guhyamantra ("Secret .

Deity and Divinities of Nyingma Tradition

Tradition is the old school of is the name given to the followers of those original translations of the of the into . The Nyingma teachings are divided into the Long Transmission (Tib. ring gyü) of the and the Short Transmission (Tib. nyé gyü) of Terma; other teachings were received by directly in Pure Visions (Tib. dak nang) from deities or , in experiences or in dreams. Particular to .

All you need to know about Yoga

is a group of physical, mental, and or disciplines which originated in . is one of the six astika schools of philosophical traditions. There is a broad variety of yoga schools, practices, and goals in , , and . The term "Yoga" in the Western world often denotes a modern form of and yoga as exercise, consisting largely of the postures or . Origin of Yoga The word Yoga .
Sambhogakaya Buddha

Buddha of luminous Light – Sambhogakaya

refers to the luminous form of clear light. The practitioner attains upon reaching the highest dimensions of practice. According to tradition, those skilled in , such as advanced and , as well as other highly realized Buddhists, may gain access to the Sambhogakaya and receive direct transmission of doctrine. Life of Sambhogakaya In this section, we are going to learn about the life of Sambhogakaya, after that, the short etymological description of .

Explaining Kalachakra

Shri is also known as a of the Non-dual classification. Kalacakra is the name of the foundational treatise of this tradition, composed in and later translated into . The life of the Kalachakra In this portion, we will learn about the life f the Kalachakra. And after that, we'll learn about the short etymological description of the word Kalachakraitself. Etymology of the Kalachakra Kalachakra is known as Dus Kyi Khor lo in . .

Lion Faced Dakini – Singhamukha Yogini

Lion-faced is a secret form of also has a relationship to Troma and the practice of . She is appropriate for clearing obstacles of the most pervasive and malignant kind and cutting through the “” of . This practice has been important in since the of . PeGyal Lingpa received this revelation directly from , appearing in a red-black form, instead of the more common dark blue .
manjushri Thangka

All about Manjushri Bodhisattva – Meaning, Iconography and Belief

is the  of . The sword in the hand of Manjushri is called the Prajna khadga or the Sword of Wisdom, which is believed to destroy the darkness of by the luminous rays issuing out of it. Manjushri, the full name of Manjushri, is a transliteration of the , which translates into a wonderful virtue, a wonderful head, and wonderful auspiciousness. Manjushri is a representative of prajna wisdom, often appearing in the classics of .
Amithabha Buddha

Amithabha Buddha Thangka Painting

is being portrayed as  but usually, he is often depicted seated in   while is reserved for a seated alone. In , is red in color (red being the color of , , and ). He is being known to protect beings from the of his unique emblem is . He is thus associated with the attributes of the : , .