About Yogachara

Yogachara is an influential tradition of Buddhist philosophy and psychology emphasizing the study of cognition, perception, and consciousness through the interior lens of meditative and yogic practices. It is also variously termed Vijñānavāda, Vijñaptivāda or Vijñaptimātratā-vāda, which is also the name given to its major epistemic theory. There are several interpretations of this main theory, some scholars see it as a kind of Idealism while others argue that it is closer to a kind of phenomenology or representationalism.
The early Buddhist tradition also taught other meditation postures, such as the standing posture and the lion posture performed lying down on one side.

Buddhist meditation – The path toward liberation

Buddhists pursue as part of the path toward liberation from defilements (kleshas) and clinging and craving (upādāna), also called awakening, which results in the attainment of Nirvana, and includes a variety of meditation techniques such as: - asubha ("reflections on repulsiveness") - reflection on pratityasamutpada (dependent origination) - sati () and (recollections), including (breath meditation) - dhyana (developing an alert and luminous mind) - the Brahma-viharas (loving-kindness and compassion) These techniques aim to develop equanimity .
The Garbhadhatu mandala. The center square represents the young stage of Vairocana Buddha.

Buddhist philosophy – The multitude of paths to liberation

Buddhist philosophy refers to the philosophical investigations and systems of inquiry that developed among various Buddhist schools in India following the parinirvana of the Buddha and later spread throughout Asia. The Buddhist path combines both philosophical reasoning and meditation. The Buddhist traditions present a multitude of Buddhist paths to liberation, and Buddhist thinkers in India and subsequently in East Asia have covered topics as varied as phenomenology, ethics, ontology, epistemology, logic and philosophy of .
Monks attending the 2003 Kalachakra empowerment in Bodhgaya, India.

Vajrayana – Buddhist tantric traditions

Vajrayana is Tantric Buddhism, the form of Northern Buddhism that relies primarily on the Tantras, technical manuals said to have been taught by the Buddha, and offer complete enlightenment in 1, 7 or 21 lifetimes. practices are connected to specific lineages in Buddhism, through the teachings of lineage holders. Others might generally refer to texts as the Buddhist Tantras. It includes practices that make use of mantras, dharanis, , mandalas and the visualization of .

Explaining Gelug Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism

The is the newest of the schools of . It was founded by a philosopher and . Gelug Lineage's field for the Accumulation of Merit with Tsongkapa at the Center is surrounded by the incarnation lineage above and with meditational deities, Confession , and protectors below. In the Gelug Tradition of Tibetan , there are numerous Refuge Field types distinguished both by the central figure .
Depicting-Indian-Teacher-Asanga Thangka

Interpreting Indian Teacher Asanga

Asaṅga is one of the most important spiritual figures of and the founder of the Yogacara school. is known as the 4th-century founder of the -Only School of . The Existence of the Asanga In this section, we are going to talk about the existence of Asanga. After a short etymological description of the word Asanga itself, we will review his frameworks for , and we will learn about Asaṅga's Disciples finally, .
Maitreya Buddha Statue -Gold Painted Face Fire Gold Plating

Interpreting Future Buddha of this World – Maitreya Buddha

is also known as Metteyya who is presented as a  future of this world in eschatology. In some Buddhist literature, such as the and Sutra, Maitreya is referred to as Ajita . Maitreya is a bodhisattva who in the Buddhist tradition is to appear on , achieve complete , and teach the pure . According to , Maitreya will be a successor of the historic Sakyamuni Buddha, the .