About Dream yoga

Dream or Milam —the Yoga of the Dream State—is a suite of advanced sadhana of the entwined Mantrayana lineages of . Dream Yoga are tantric processes and within the trance of Dream and Sleep Six Yogas of .
In the tradition of the , Dream Yoga method is usually passed on by a qualified teacher to his/her students after necessary initiation. Various are unanimous that it is more of a passing of an experience rather than any textual information.

A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .
Male and female yogis in 17th- and 18th-century India

Yoga styles – The wide variety of traditional & modern practices

There is a wide variety of schools of , practices, and goals in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and other traditional and modern yoga styles practiced worldwide. Within the major branches of yoga such as haṭha, lāya, rāja, jñāna, and there are many different schools and lineages, both extant and defunct. Since the late 19th century, a great number of distinct new styles of "Yoga" have been introduced by individual teachers. Some schools and traditions are occasionally .
Buddha Amitayus in his Pure Land Sukhavati.

Dzogchen practices – Awakening rigpa

Dzogchen ("Great Perfection" or "Great Completion"), also known as atiyoga (utmost yoga), is a tradition of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism aimed at discovering and continuing in the ultimate ground of existence. The primordial ground is said to have the qualities of purity (i.e. emptiness), spontaneity (lhun grub, associated with luminous clarity) and compassion (thugs rje). The goal of Dzogchen is knowledge of this basis, this knowledge is called rigpa (Skt. vidyā). There are numerous spiritual .
The early Buddhist tradition also taught other meditation postures, such as the standing posture and the lion posture performed lying down on one side.

Buddhist meditation – The path toward liberation

Buddhists pursue as part of the path toward liberation from defilements (kleshas) and clinging and craving (upādāna), also called awakening, which results in the attainment of Nirvana, and includes a variety of meditation techniques such as: - asubha ("reflections on repulsiveness") - reflection on pratityasamutpada (dependent origination) - sati () and (recollections), including (breath meditation) - dhyana (developing an alert and luminous mind) - the Brahma-viharas (loving-kindness and compassion) These techniques aim to develop equanimity .
Manjuvajra Embracing His Consort

Tantric practices – The esoteric South Asian traditions

Tantra are the esoteric traditions of and Buddhism that developed in South Asia from the middle of the 1st millennium CE onwards. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice. A key feature of these traditions is the use of mantras, and thus they are commonly referred to as Mantramārga ("Path of Mantra") in Hinduism or Mantrayāna ("Mantra Vehicle") and Guhyamantra ("Secret .
vajrayogini

Interpreting Vajravarahi and 5 Deities Tibetan Painting

Vajravarahi, 5 Deity principal tutelary deity of the . The life of Vajravarahi In this portion, we are going to learn about the life of Vajrabarahi, after that the short description of the word Vajravarahi itself. Etymology of Vajravarahi Vajravarahi is known as Asrdo Rje Phag mo in . Vajravarahi is one of the most popular female deities in all traditions of . Earlier, we learn about the life of the Vajravarahi. Now, we .