About Refuge tree

The imagery of the Refuge Tree, also referred to as Refuge Assembly, Refuge Field, Merit Field, Field of Merit or Field of Accumulation is a key part of a visualization and foundational meditation practice common to Tantric Buddhism. Based on descriptions in the liturgical texts of various traditions, Refuge Trees are often depicted in thangkas employed as objects of veneration, mnemonic devices and as a precursor to the contents being fully visualized by the Buddhist practitioner during the Refuge Formula or evocation.

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The Lineage Tree – visualization of Refuge Tree

has such a unifying symbol, known variously as a Refuge assembly, Field of Merit, or . It is known as a Refuge assembly because it is a visualized gathering of figures representing the three Refuges. It is known as a Field of Merit because by visualizing a great array of figures and then making to them, and by performing other skillful actions, such as committing oneself to path .
Nyingma refuge tree - Longchen Nyingtik Lineage

Nyingma Lineage tree thangka with explanation chart

The subject depicted in this is called Guruparampara, a “Line of Teachers.” It depicts the family tree of lineage, as it were, and its function is to indicate a line of descent. The meaning of this presentation is to show a refuge for believers. It creates a kind of structure with a number of deities and teachers in whom devotees take refuge, because they will help believers in the course of their spiritual development.  .
vajrayogini

Interpreting Vajravarahi and 5 Deities Tibetan Painting

Vajravarahi, 5 Deity principal tutelary deity of the . The life of Vajravarahi In this portion, we are going to learn about the life of Vajrabarahi, after that the short description of the word Vajravarahi itself. Etymology of Vajravarahi Vajravarahi is known as Asrdo Rje Phag mo in . Vajravarahi is one of the most popular female deities in all traditions of . Earlier, we learn about the life of the Vajravarahi. Now, we .

The Magic of Composition in Tibetan paintings

By the the painter sat down to begin the sketch he already had in the main contents and of the . Usually, the patron had indicated to the painter precisely which deities he wanted to be depicted. Sometimes the patron also furnished a diagram that showe the names and relative positions of each figure in the , such diagrams often having been composed by the of the patron. When the patron provided .
A leaf from a Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom) manuscript.

Tibetan Buddhist practices – Schools, sutras & tantras

Apart from classical Mahāyāna Buddhist practices like the six perfections, Tibetan Buddhism also includes tantric practices, such as and the as well as methods which are seen as transcending tantra, like . In Tibetan Buddhism, practices are generally classified as either Sutra (or Pāramitāyāna) or Tantra ( or Mantrayāna), though exactly what constitutes each category and what is included and excluded in each is a matter of debate and .