About Dhyana in Buddhism

Buddha in Dhyana, which in this context means: The meditative training stage on the path to Samadhi.
In the oldest texts of Buddhism, dhyāna (Sanskrit) or jhāna (Pali) is the training of the mind, commonly translated as meditation, to withdraw the mind from the automatic responses to sense-impressions, and leading to a "state of perfect equanimity and awareness (upekkhā-sati-parisuddhi)." Dhyana may have been the core practice of pre-sectarian Buddhism, in combination with several related practices which together lead to perfected mindfulness and detachment, and are fully realized with the practice of dhyana.

Products related to Dhyana in Buddhism

The early Buddhist tradition also taught other meditation postures, such as the standing posture and the lion posture performed lying down on one side.

Buddhist meditation – The path toward liberation

Buddhists pursue as part of the path toward liberation from defilements (kleshas) and clinging and craving (upādāna), also called awakening, which results in the attainment of Nirvana, and includes a variety of meditation techniques such as: - asubha ("reflections on repulsiveness") - reflection on pratityasamutpada (dependent origination) - sati () and (recollections), including (breath meditation) - dhyana (developing an alert and luminous mind) - the Brahma-viharas (loving-kindness and compassion) These techniques aim to develop equanimity .
Buddha in Dhyana, which in this context means: The meditative training stage on the path to Samadhi.

Buddhist Mindfulness – People, concepts & teachings

is the practice of purposely bringing one's attention in the present moment without evaluation, a skill one develops through or other training. Mindfulness derives from sati, a significant element of Buddhist traditions, and is based on Zen, Vipassanā, and Tibetan meditation techniques. Though definitions and techniques of mindfulness are wide-ranging, Buddhist traditions explain what constitutes mindfulness such as how past, present and future moments arise and cease as momentary sense impressions and .
Rigveda (padapatha) manuscript in Devanagari, early 19th century

Glossary of Sanskrit words & phrases

The following list consists of notable concepts that are derived from Hindu and Buddhist cultures and associated traditions, which are expressed as words in Sanskrit or other Indic languages and Dravidian languages. The main purpose of this list is to make it easy for one to find specific concepts, and to provide a guide to unique concepts of and all in one place. Many Sanskrit concepts have an Indian secular meaning as well as .