About Hungry ghost

Hungry ghost is a concept in Chinese Buddhism, Chinese traditional religion, Japanese Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhism, representing beings who are driven by intense emotional needs in an animalistic way. The terms 餓鬼 èguǐ literally "hungry ghost", are the Chinese translation of the term preta in Buddhism. "Hungry ghosts" play a role in Chinese Buddhism and Taoism as well as in Chinese folk religion The term is not to be confused with the generic term for "ghost" or damnation, 鬼 guǐ. The understanding is that all people become such a regular ghost when they die, and would then slowly weaken and eventually die a second time.

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6 Realms and Chenrezig – Rebirth and Existence

is the lord of . "Every person whose heart is moved by love and , who deeply and sincerely acts for the benefit of others without concern for fame, profit, social position, or recognition expresses the activity of Chenrezig." The Associated with Chenrezig typically identifies six of rebirth and existence. The six realms are listed below: Asuras Humans Earlier refer to five realms rather than six realms; .

Buddhist Ritual Items and Symbols

is one of the most established world that has ever seen. Over the great expanse of , it has quietly established its own set of symbolisms – that are as old as time itself. This is only but with all the religions of the civilized world. And as such, many of these are considered recognizable icons of and . The more prominent symbols .

Types of Thangka Found in Nepal

are basically sacred Buddhist . “ is a type of painting executed on the cloth and often framed with brocade Tibetan . They are images of different , goddesses, and significant related to the philosophy of . Regarded as the very of , these paintings are a means by which the highest ideals of Buddhism are discussed. However, many Buddhist monasteries still use the tables as a means of financial .

Description of the Kingdom of Shambhala

Descriptions of the kingdom of are based both on literature said to emanate from Shambhala itself and by later commentators, mainly , who claimed to have visited the kingdom in the material realm, on an etheric plane, in dreams, or by some other means. As the descriptions will make clear, this is not of “historical” Shambhala; i.e., a country that once existed in the time-space continuum recognized by Western historiography—for instance, the kingdom .

The Wheel of Life

illustrates in a popular way the of the , the Four Truths,  the existence of earthly , its origin and cause, the ending or prevention of misery and the practice path to liberation from suffering.   The   Three Poisons The center of the wheel represents the three poisons. They are or , or aggression, . Desire is passion, one of the three principal destructive .