Explaining God of Compassion Avalokitesvara

Statue of Sahasrabhuja Avalokitesvara with Coral Torquise and Lapis and Metal Setting

Explaining God of Compassion Avalokitesvara

is a who uses to embodies the of all . He is one of the more widely revered who helps in mainstream . In and its sphere of cultural influence, Avalokitesvara is often depicted in an also female form known as Guan Yin.

The Viability of Avalokitesvara

In this portion, we are going to learn about the viability of Avalokitesvara, after the short description of the word Avalokitesvara itself

Avalokitesvara is also known as referred to as or .

Etymology of Avalokitesvara

Avalokitesvara is said to be as in . In Mongolia, he is called Megjid Janraisig, Xongsim Bodisadv-a, or Niduber Ujegci.

Earlier, we learn about the viability of Avalokitesvara. Now, we are going to learn about the origin of the accounts of Avalokitesvara.

Accounts of Avalokitesvara

In this section, we are going to learn about the accounts of Avalokitesvara, and description of Mahayana account, account, and Theravada account.

 Mahayana account

According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokitesvara is who has made a great to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in of difficulty and to postpone his own until he has assisted every being on in achieving . Mahayana associated with Avalokitesvara include the and Sutra, particularly which has the 25th chapter, which is sometimes referred to as the Avalokitesvara Sutra. Six of Avalokitesvara in Mahayana:

  1. Great compassion
  2. Great loving-
  3. Lion -
  4.  Universal light
  5.  The leader amongst and men
  6.  The great omnipresent

Each of these bodhisattva’s six qualities of pity, etc., breaks the hindrances respectively of the , Pretas, , asuras men, and devas.

Vajrayana account

In the tradition, Avalokitesvara also seems as arising from two sources. One is the relative source, wherein a previous eon a devoted, compassionate became a bodhisattva, transformed in the present Kalpa into Avalokitesvara. That is not in conflict, however, with the ultimate source, which is Avalokitesvara as the universal manifestation of compassion.

Seven forms of Avalokitesvara in esoteric :

  1. Amoghapasa a. not empty net or lasso.
  2.  Vara-Sahasrabhuja-Locana/Sahasrabhujasahasranetra, 1000-hand and 1000-eye,
  3. Hayagriva, horse-headed
  4.  Ekadasamukha,11-faced
  5.  Candi
  6.  -; of sovereign power
  7.  Arya Lokitesvara

Theravada account

Although mainstream Theravada does not any of the Mahayana bodhisattvas, Avalokitesvara is popularly worshiped in Burma, where she is called Lokanat, and Thailand, where she is called Lokesvara.

Earlier, we learn about the viability of Avalokitesvara and the origin of the accounts of Avalokitesvara. Now, we are going to learn about the of Avalokitesvara.

Mantras

In this section, we are going to learn about the of Avalokitesvara, after, we will learn about .

Om Mani Padme Hum

relates Chenrezig to the six-syllable mantra Mani Padme Hum. Thus, Chenrezig is also known as Shadakshari. The connection between this famous mantra and the Avalokitesvara already occurs in the  Karandavyuha Sutra, one of the first to have reached Tibet.

In Buddhism, the mantra used to praise Avalokitesvara is On Aro-Rikya Sowaka but Om Mani Padme Hum is occasionally used as well. This mantra is popular in China, , and Taiwan.

Earlier, we learn about the viability of Avalokitesvara, the origin of the accounts of Avalokitesvara, and the mantras of Avalokitesvara. Now, we are going to learn about the thousand arms of Avalokitesvara.

The thousand arms of Avalokitesvara

We will learn about the thousand arms of Avalokitesvara.

One prominent Buddhist story tells of Avalokitesvara vowing never to rest until he had freed all sentient beings from . Despite strenuous effort, he realizes that still many unhappy beings were yet to be saved. After struggling to comprehend the needs of so many, his head splits into eleven pieces. , seeing his plight, gives him eleven heads with which to hear the cries of the .

Upon these cries and comprehending them, Avalokitesvara attempts to reach out to all those who needed aid but found that his two arms shattered into pieces. Once more, comes to his aid and invests him with a thousand arms with which to aid the suffering multitudes. Many versions of the tale include eight arms with which Avalokitesvara skillfully upholds the , each possessing its own particular implement, while more Chinese-specific ones give varying accounts of this number.

The Baoan located in northwestern Sichuan province, China has an outstanding wooden image of the thousand-armed Avalokiteśvara, an example of the Ming Dynasty decorative sculpture.

Earlier, we learn about the viability of Avalokitesvara, the origin of the accounts of Avalokitesvara, the mantras of Avalokitesvara, and the thousand arms of Avalokitesvara. Now, we are going to learn about beliefs concerning Chenrezig.

Tibetan Buddhist beliefs concerning Chenrezig

We will learn about Tibetan Buddhist beliefs concerning Chenrezig.

Avalokitesvara is an important deity in Tibetan Buddhism and is regarded as the Vajrayana as a Buddha. In the Mahayana teachings, he is in general regarded as a high-level Bodhisattva. The is considered by the sect to be Chenrezig’s primary manifestation.

It is said that prophesied that Avalokitesvara will manifest himself in the lineages of the and the Karmapas. Another Tibetan source explains that Buddha Amithaba gave to one of his two main disciples, Avalokitesvara, the task to take upon himself the burden of caring for Tibet. That is why he has manifested himself not only as spiritual teachers in Tibet but also in the form of or ministers.

Other manifestations popular in Tibet include Sahasra-Bhuja and Ekadasamukha. In Tibetan Buddhism, acts as the consort and energizer of Avalokitesvara Chenrezig. According to popular belief, came into existence from a single tear shed by Chenrezig.

When the tear fell to the it created a lake, and a opening in the lake revealed Tara. In another version of this story, Tara emerges from the heart of Chenrezig. In either version, it is Chenrezig’s outpouring of compassion which manifests Tara as a being.

Earlier, we learn about the viability of Avalokitesvara, the origin of the accounts of Avalokitesvara, the mantras of Avalokitesvara, and the thousand arms of Avalokitesvara. And finally, we learn about Tibetan Buddhist beliefs concerning Chenrezig.

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