Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje with Nyingma Masters

Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje with Nyingma Masters

Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje with Nyingma Masters

This 19th-century depicts the central figure of Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje with previous above.

Thangka Painting Chart

Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje with Nyingma Masters

Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje with Nyingma Masters

N°1 Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje

Do Khyentse Yeshe Dorje was born in 1800 in the Golok region of Amdo to nomadic parents. His father was Chokor Sonampel of the Golok Akyong clan, and his mother was Tsewang Men of the Dawaclan.

The First Dodrubchen Jigme Trinle Oser, who would become his main teacher, and the Second Ponlop Sang-ngak Tenzin, both recognized him as the emanation of .

Soon after the recognition his parents moved him to Dodrubchen’s encampment, later also following him to and to the Dege court.

N°2 Jigme Lingpa

Jigme Lingpa (1730–1798) was a of the Nyingma sect of .

He was the promulgator of the Longchen Nyingthik, the Heart Essence of , from whom, according to tradition, he received a vision in which the teachings were revealed.

The Longchen Nyingthik eventually became the most famous and widely practiced cycle of Dzogchen teachings.

N°3 Longchenpa

Longchen Rabjampa, Drimé Özer, commonly abbreviated to Longchenpa (1308–1364), was a major teacher in the .

Along with and , he is commonly recognized as one of the three main manifestations of to have taught in Central .

His major is the , which encapsulates the previous 600 years of thought in Tibet.

Longchenpa was a critical link in the exoteric and esoteric transmission of the Dzogchen teachings. He was of , one of Tibet’s most important monasteries and the first established in the , but spent most of his life traveling or in retreat.

N°4

Despite the many layers of the legend that have accreted around Padmasambhava, scholars generally agree that a renowned Indian master by that name did visit and teach in Tibet in the late eighth century.

Our earliest evidence for his activities comes from several tenth-century manuscripts found in the so-called “library cave” of .

Pelliot tibétain 44 is a small booklet devoted to the tantric deity Vajrakīla. It describes the master’s in and prior to his trip to Tibet.

According to this account, he gathered the texts and performed the rites for The Hundred Thousand [Verse] of Vajrakīla at the Asura cave in Yanglesho, Nepal.

During this same period, he is also said to have tamed four troublesome and bestowed upon them new Buddhist names.

On gaining accomplishment in the practices of Vajrakīla, the master then performed a series of miracles, including the magical diversion of a stream for irrigation purposes.

N°5

Heruka is the name of a category of wrathful deities, beings in that adopt a fierce countenance to benefit sentient beings. In East , these are called .

Heruka represents the embodiment of indivisible bliss and emptiness. They appear as Istha-devata or meditational deities for tantric sadhana, usually placed in a and often appearing in .

 

N°6 Dechen Gyalmo

Yumka Dechen Gyalmo (Tib. ཡུམ་ཀ་བདེ་ཆེན་རྒྱལ་མོ་) the practice from the Longchen Nyingtik, the terma revelation of Jigme Lingpa. She is a form of .

Thondup explains that Yumka Dechen Gyalmo is a sadhana practice on , the consort of , as a dakini.

It is one of the practice of the Longchen Nyingtik together with Rigdzin Dupa and Palchen Dupa.

In 1774 the omniscient Jigme Lingpa visited the Tsogyal Lake. There, amid wondrous signs, he beheld the face of the Wisdom Dakini. He also received the symbolic scripts which he deciphered in order to produce the practice text.

N°7

Ekajati or Ekajata, is one of the 21 .

Ekajati is, along with deity, one of the most powerful and fierce goddesses of .

According to Tibetan legends, her right eye was pierced by the tantric master Padmasambhava so that she could much more effectively help him subjugate Tibetan demons.

About sadiksha

Namaste! I am a Nepali Art Dealer specialized in Mandala and Thangka paintings. I love to write articles about the monastic culture of the Himalayas. If you like this post or have any question please leave me a comment or use the contact page to reach me.

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